Weekend Novelist
I have been writing since first grade, though never in cursive. I love reading historical fiction and no period captivates me more than the Wars of the Roses.

It little profits that an idle king,/ By this still hearth, among these barren crags,/ Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,/ That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me./ I cannot rest from travel; I will drink/ Life to the lees. All times I have enjoy'd/ Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those/ That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when/ Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades/ Vext the dim sea. I am become a name;/ For always roaming with a hungry heart/ Much have I seen and known ...

From the October 2016 episode of Chivalry Today podcast: "Conversation #15 with author Lonnie Colson, author of The Second Great Mortality, a zombie apocalypse novel set in 15th century England. If zombie tales force us to confront the thin veneer of civility and humanity we live with in the modern world, what can a medieval zombie uprising teach us about the ideals of chivalry in 15th century culture (as well as today)? The Second Great Mortality is the perfect read for any medieval history enthusiast this Halloween season."

For The Second Great Mortality, the parish church at Colleville needed to be small and unimportant. I wanted it to bear the name of a local saint, so I chose the relatively little-known Wigstan and opted for the older spelling of Wystan. While doing research for another historical fiction project a couple years ago, I stumbled across an article about caretakers of a small Welsh village's church discovered stunning 15th-century wall paintings under 20 layers of limewash. Saint Cadoc's in Llancarfan, Vale of Glamorgan ...

WELLINGTON — Lonnie Colson never set out to become an author let alone a writer of fantasy horror. His first love has always been medieval history, and no period captivates him more than fifteenth-century England. As a kid growing up in Wellington, his only outlet was dueling friends with trashcan lids and cane poles in his back yard and watching Arthurian movies such as Knights of the Round Table, Sword of the Valiant, and Excalibur. One day while leafing through newspapers in search of a debate topic for English class ...

The priory at Stony Heath was largely inspired by the remains of Timoleague Friary, a thirteenth-century Fransiscan monastery located in Timoleague, County Cork, Ireland. It was founded by the Fransiscans in 1240 on the site of a settlement founded by Saint Molaga in the 6th century. For The Second Great Mortality, I wanted to model the priory after a monastery from the correct period in order to provide a sense of historical accuracy. Although Timoleague was started in 1240, most of its surviving structures were completed by the 1400s. ...

It is impossible to tell a good story without dialogue, and believable dialogue requires a liberal dose of exclamations and interjections. Everyone from a pious priest to a salty sailor uses them to some degree—even your dear old grandmother. Stub your toe, mash your finger, or get cut off in traffic and there is a good chance you are going to shout something. The more colorful the exclamation, the more objectionable it will be considered in polite company. It was not until I became a father that I began to recognize the degree to ...

Zombies. Zombies have become so engrained into our culture that a few years back the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention even capitalized on their popularity to teach emergency preparedness. The word itself is a relatively modern addition to the English language, having been borrowed from Haitian folklore sometime in the nineteenth century, and would have been as foreign to the medieval man as the word zipper. For that reason, the undead are called many things by the characters in the story, but the z-word is never used. ...

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The Second Great Mortality is a tale of Pestilence, warfare, and un-death. It represents my first full-length work of fiction. Proceeds from its sale will directly contribute to my jousting addiction.