Historical Reenactment
A lifelong Medieval history enthusiast, I enjoy the knightly pursuits of jousting, hunting, and sword fighting.

Although still several months away, I have already begun making preparations to attend the Days of Knights event in Oak Grove, Kentucky. I had an incredible time last year and learned quite a lot from long-time participants such as Ian LaSpina of Knyght Errant and Tom Biliter of Historically Patterned Mail. The Days of Knights is definitely one of the most anticipated events on my calendar. I intend to once again take part in the historical encampment as well as the Deed of Arms. Last year I set my pavilion up next to the renown La Belle Compagnie ...

I currently wear a pair of tailored mail sleeves created by Nick Checksfield. Nick has been making and restoring mail since 1992. He is currently an educator at Windsor Castle but has worked in the past as a mail restorer at the Wallace Collection. Nick has also been seen as a mail subject expert in documentaries such as "Going Medieval" with Mike Loades. Nick has handled the originals in the Royal Armouries Collection at the Tower of London. They originals are constructed of 7mm riveted rings and have broad gussets ...

Last month I joined scores of other medieval re-enactors at the Oak Grove War Memorial Walking Trail, site of this year's The Days of Knights event. The mile-long trail weaves in and around a wooded park that serves as a frisbee golf course. The encampment was laid out chronologically along the trail like a visual timeline of European history from the Vikings to the early Renaissance. It was also my first opportunity to meet a number of well-known personalities from Facebook and YouTube. Among them were Ian LaSpina of Knyght Errant, ...

Regardless to how the crossbow was viewed on the battlefield, it was ever a high-status hunting weapon. Unlike the longbow, a crossbow could be kept fully spanned for a considerable amount of time. The crossbows of noblemen sometimes had a veneer of intricately-carved stag horn and/or elaborate patterned inlays. I recently commissioned a fifteenth-century hunting crossbow from Danilo "Tod" Todeschini of Tod's Workshop. Tod's expert craftmanship is featured extensively in Mike Loades's bookThe Crossbow.

Several months ago I made a fairly important resolution for 2017. This was not one of those half-hearted pledges to give up some enjoyably bad habit most people make on New Year’s Day only to succumb to temptation a few hours later. To be fair, like more than a few other resolutions I have previously made, there was not exactly a considerable amount of critical thinking involved. Nevertheless, it would require a major personal commitment to accomplish: I was going to the Days of Knights this year. Several months ago I made a decision ...

Every knight must have his own unique armorial to differentiate himself in the lists. The following is my assumed armorial achievement:
Arms: Gules, on a Chevron Or three cross crosslets fitchy of the first, on a chief of the second a Bear Sable passant langued and amred of the first.
Crest: A demi-bear Sable and langued gules holding between its forepaws a sword.
Motto: legibus juraque servo. I service justice and the law

For a member of the knightly class in the fifteenth century, hunting was far more than a simple hobby or pleasurable pastime--it was the very essence of life. Gaston III, compte de Foix, wrote in his treatise Livre de Chasse, or Book of the Hunt:tout mon temps me suis delite par especial en trois choses, l'une est en armes, l'autre est en amours, et l'autre si est en chasce..., or in "all my time I am delighted in three things, the one is in arms, the other is in love, and the other is in hunting." He would only claim to be an expert in the last.

My Medieval Obsession